A.E. Larson Building – Yakima WA

The eleven-story A.E. Larson Building was built in 1931 as Yakima’s first skyscraper and is still a prominent landmark for the city with its Art Deco architecture on display for all who pass along Yakima Ave on the edge of downtown.
A.E. Larson Building
photo by Gary Paulson
When it was built, the structure was the tallest building for 100 miles in any direction. Although it has given up that distinction, it is still an important office building in Yakima.

In the midst of the Great Depression, Alfred E. Larson committed $600,000 of his own funds to build his namesake building because he believed the area would recover quickly and because he could save money due to reduced construction costs.

The building rises 188 feet to the top of its flagpole with retail shops on the ground floor along with the ornate main lobby. The building is clad in salmon-colored brick and terra cotta. The ground level is faced with stone with Art Deco bronze accents that add an element of sophistication to this already stunning edifice.

The A.E. Larson Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 for its Art Deco architecture and impact on Yakima’s development.

The eleven-story A.E. Larson Building was built in 1931 as Yakima’s first skyscraper and is still a prominent landmark for the city with its Art Deco architecture on display for all who pass along Yakima Ave on the edge of downtown.

When it was built, the structure was the tallest building for 100 miles in any direction. Although it has given up that distinction, it is still an important office building in Yakima.

In the midst of the Great Depression, Alfred E. Larson committed $600,000 of his own funds to build his namesake building because he believed the area would recover quickly and because he could save money due to reduced construction costs.

The building rises 188 feet to the top of its flagpole with retail shops on the ground floor along with the ornate main lobby. The building is clad in salmon-colored brick and terra cotta. The ground level is faced with stone with Art Deco bronze accents that add an element of sophistication to this already stunning edifice.

A.E. Larson Building
photo by Gary Paulson
The A.E. Larson Building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 for its Art Deco architecture and impact on Yakima’s development.